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Question # 1 ( D )

Question # 1 ( D )

  • Among the most deadly pandemics in history, how many were killed?

1918 flu pandemic

The 1918 flu pandemic (the "Spanish flu") was an influenza pandemic, and the first of the two pandemics involving H1N1 influenza virus (the second was the 2009 flu pandemic, an outbreak of swine flu). It was an unusually severe and deadly pandemic that spread across the world. Historical and epidemiological data are inadequate to identify the geographic origin.[1] Most victims were healthy young adults, in contrast to most influenza outbreaks, which predominantly affect juvenile, elderly, or weakened patients. The flu pandemic was implicated in the outbreak of encephalitis lethargica in the 1920s.[2]

The pandemic lasted from June 1918 to December 1919,[3] spreading even to the Arctic and remote Pacific islands. Between 50 and 100 million died, making it one of the deadliest natural disasters in human history.[4][5][6][7][8] Even using the lower estimate of 50 million people, 3% of the world's population (which was 1.86 billion at the time[9]) died of the disease. Some 500 million, or 27%, were infected.[5]

    Question # 2 ( B )

    Question # 2 ( B )

     

    • 50% of the age group that were killed during the deadliest pandemic?

    Another unusual feature of this pandemic was that it mostly killed young adults, with 99% of pandemic influenza deaths occurring in people under 65, and more than half in young adults 20 to 40 years old.[47] This is unusual, since influenza is normally most deadly to the very young (under age two) and the very old (over age 70), and may have been due to partial protection caused by exposure to the previous Russian flu pandemic of 1889.[48] Modern analysis has shown the virus to be particularly deadly because it triggers a cytokine storm, which ravages the stronger immune system of young adults

    Question # 3 ( A )

    Question # 3 ( A )

    • Short and long haul trucks move how much food supply daily?

    Grocery stores require deliveries of perishable food items every two to three days
    . .... A major problem when the next major disaster occurs for the long-haul trucking industry would be roads and highways impassable. Grocery stores will run out of supplies in a very short period… People who have not prepared will make a run on the whatever supplies are on the shelf. Most of these supplies will not be storable and will have to be consumed quickly. Hunger will be a significant issue for many!

    Question # 4 ( C )

    Question # 4 ( C )

    • If highways were impassable, grocery stores would run out of food?

    In some severe catastrophes, disaster safety steps extend far past the immediate event. After a disaster, roads and highways may be damaged or impassable, normal communication lines may be unavailable, and services like electricity, water, and gas may become compromised. Providing for basic needs that may arise after a hurricane, earthquake or other disaster is an important part of disaster safety. Trucks will be limited to short distances leading to few or no deliveries to grocery stores.

    Safety experts recommend having a survival kit in every vehicle in the event of an emergency. This kit can be tailored to fit individual needs and supplies will alter for different people. At minimum, disaster safety kits typically include non-perishable food rations, clean water for several days, and some means of warmth, like blankets.

     

    Question # 5 ( B )

    Question # 5 ( B )

    • Hurricane Katrina, third deadliest Hurricane, killed how many?

    Reports from the old blog. many received a lot of criticism for this, but this is still probably the best death toll for direct and indirect deaths for Hurricane Katrina out there.

    Victims totaling 1,723, direct deaths combined with testimony about a study done after the hurricane that showed a huge increase in excess deaths in the period after the hurricane was over. The resulting total of 4,081 is probably the most accurate total out there for direct and indirect deaths from the storm so far, unless someone has added in some more indirect deaths. This figure came under some criticism, but it is based on the solid epidemiological theory of excess mortality.

    The offical deat toll of 1723, representing deaths due to immediate and direct effects of the storm, has not changed since August 22, 2006. However, there is a fascinating document that comes from testimony delivered to Congress, which has cause many to raise the total deaths from Katrina due to direct and immediate plus delayed effects to 4,081

    Question # 6 ( C )

    Question # 6 ( C )

    • How many people became homeless after Hurricane Katrina?

    Over 10,000 people were made homeless after hurricane Katrina and that is just in New Orleans!  Also, there was a catastrophic flooding of the lower part leading many to agree the homless from this one single disaster is much higher than 10,000 in just the New Orleans sector!

    Question # 7 ( A )

    Question # 7 ( A )

    • Disastrous tornado wind speed that affected Mississippi and Alabama in 2011?

    "never seen anything like it".  This truly was one for the history books.

    The F5 tornado that ripped through the Tuscaloosa, Alabama area was reportedly so monstrous that it is still kind of difficult to believe that it was actually real.  The thing was a mile wide and scientists are estimating that it had winds that exceeded 260 miles an hour.


    Question # 8 ( A )

    Question # 8 ( A )

    • Alabama Mississippi  tornadoes  traveled how many miles on the ground?

    According to National Geographic, this monster tornado may have traveled a whopping 300 miles across Alabama and Georgia.

    Question # 9 ( A )

    Question # 9 ( A )

    • Each year wildfires erupt consuming how many acres, burning everything in its path?

    On average, more than 100,000 wildfires, also called wildland fires or forest fires, clear 4 million to 5 million acres (1.6 million to 2 million hectares) of land in the U.S. every year. In recent years, wildfires have burned up to 9 million acres (3.6 million hectares) of land. A wildfire moves at speeds of up to 14 miles an hour (23 kilometers an hour), consuming everything—trees, brush, homes, even humans—in its path.

    Question # 10 ( B )

    Question # 10 ( B )

    •  Wildfires wind speed speed is, depending on winds, consuming everything in its path?

    On average, more than 100,000 wildfires, also called wildland fires or forest fires, clear 4 million to 5 million acres (1.6 million to 2 million hectares) of land in the U.S. every year. In recent years, wildfires have burned up to 9 million acres (3.6 million hectares) of land. A wildfire moves at speeds of up to 14 miles an hour (23 kilometers an hour), consuming everything—trees, brush, homes, even humans—in its path

    Question # 11 ( A, B, C & D )

    Question # 11 ( A, B, C & D )

    • Why do some many give little thought to emergency preparedness?

    Most people have the mind-set "It won't happen to me!" Unfortunately, it can. Natural disasters are becoming increasingly common, and with today's budget cuts, many emergency personnel jobs have been eliminated. During a major catastrophe, resources such as food, water, and first aid could be stretched thin. If "Hurricane Katrina" has taught the citizenry anything, it is this; You cannot depend on others for basic necessities. Emergency preparedness begins at home.

    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6851749

    Question # 12 ( A, B, C & D )

    Question # 12 ( A, B, C & D )

    •  Emergency Preparedness includes?

    Be informed, make a plan, built a kit and maintain supplies for self-sustainability. Our site has a great deal of content so you can both become better informed while developing a plan. As for supplies, we have a vast selection with options to purchase in large quanities or small amounts at a time.

     

     

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